Building a Culture of Excellence with Automation with Amahl Williams

About This Episode

Amahl Williams, Partner at Reveal Group, stops in to Decision Point to talk with Brad about creating a culture of excellence in a business, what it really means, and how automation can help smooth out the process and not have you stuck inside during happy hour.
Amahl had his successes in the sales field for many years before taking on the new challenge of RPA and IPA technologies to get businesses running smoother. But it was his successes from sales, as well as a military-raised background coupled with a collegiate athletic career, that allowed Amahl to face this new challenge and quickly adapt to the different needs it presented.

Listen Now

Building a Culture of Excellence with Automation with Amahl Williams

Share This Podcast

Get Podcasts In Your Inbox

GET MORE GREAT PODCASTS DELIVERED TO YOUR INBOX

Episode Transcript

[00:00:00] Amahl Williams: Yep. So here’s the thing for me, right? So just as by way of pedigree and background, I was a three sport captain in college very active throughout the entire school year. And I had to have different levels of conditioning for each one of the sports. And so part of being soccer dad that I like is one sports.

I didn’t play with soccer. Right. But I know there are some principles that are foundational to all sports, right. So it’s going to be conditioning, right? It’s going to be coachability, right. It’s going to be available. And then it’s going to be teamwork and sportsmanship to me, all sports, have those elements.

I think those are things that regardless of your skill set, you can strive towards achieving or attaining. Right? Additionally, my aunt gave me this additional charter and kind of intimidated me. So as he interviewed at Facebook and got the gig there, she talked about, she wanted her work to be beautiful.

Right. She never wanted somebody to question the caliber. Or the quality of her work. She always wanted to create an output that said, this person is invested. This person is informed. This person cares about the outcome. And I think some of the lessons when we talk about sports, it’s I don’t want a lot from the teams that are undefeated.

I really don’t. Right. Because being undefeated is only hard. If you lose to somebody who isn’t as good as you, the teams that I liked are the one and two loss teams, because it’s like, how did you bounce back from utopia? So what I, what I typically see is. In healthy sports cultures, right? The folks that are in the lead or the start.

They have earned that. Right. And the backups don’t question, it’s like, Jeff is better than me, right? Todd is exceptional or whatever it may be as, as, as my qualifier. So what my son, he’s very good at sports to the extent to which a seven year old can be good. Right? So path of least resistance, you know, high velocity scoring and all these other things like that.

Right. But now, as the kids are catching up and it’s becoming more competitive, this is where that discipline comes in. Am I on time and my early am I ready mentally? Am I helping my teammates and all of those things? And so for me, I honestly don’t care about the outcome of the game because of they’re so young that we don’t even measure it.

And during the pandemic we gave up, also the measurement, what I am going to be concerned about is the efforts while he’s on the pitch, because he’s a bigger kid, right? The kids look up to him, they respond, may interact with him differently based upon the success of the game. And so to me, When I played college sports, I never wanted my backup to be like a mall’s just there.

Cause he’s bigger than me and genetics. And what have you. I want it to be somebody where I gave an effort and I had a pedigree around my work ethic where they said, you know what? Not only should I aspire to do the things that he’s doing, but I think he’s doing the things that put him in a position to be successful.

And, you know, I love that part of the game because there’s plenty of guys on, on every team, Akron, you know I own it wherever you look. There’s second and third string guys who were never going to touch the field other than blowouts and may be special. Right. That’s not their story. That’s not their legacy.

Their legacy is all the practices, all the bus rides, managing the workload. So you’re grinding it out on in the classroom during the day. You’re prioritizing your physical fitness during the rest of the time. And then there’s your conduct as a part of the team off the field. So there’s just so many more life lessons about sports than the outcome of the game that I thought that that would be a nice carry over into business.

Right? It’s not about the work that gets published. It’s what you’ve learned about the work. That didn’t get published and how you can repurpose it and leverage it kind of going forward. It’s not about the first customer it’s I got this from my last interview. I think Kelsey saw this it’s about how your company has to change to make sure it stays above $10 million for the rest of his existence.

And some of those behaviors and patterns are like, Are we documenting process, is the process repeatable and scalable? Have we gotten the folks who were part of the team to buy into the vision? Have we taken their feedback? So now they own some of the process. And so when I look at those things, there are a lot of corollaries and overlaps, but I just don’t want my son to look at them as buying them.

Right. So when he’s doing his class where he does really well at stem stuff, cause he has half of my brain and the other half is my wife’s brain. I want him to raise towards the things that he’s weak. Right. And I don’t want him to slack at the things that he’s strong at. And so that’s where I coach him.

I don’t want to say I coach my, my colleagues because that’s not what I do with my colleagues. I share my vision. I tell them why I think they’re special and what I think that they do well. And then I had to have them pitch back to me their vision. So it’s like based upon your understanding of what we need to do to be successful and how I kind of talked about you, what I like about you and how I think.

All of us be successful, you know, which parts of this do you want to own? And that’s new for me. Before I was a partner, I didn’t have to do that. It was more like, do what I say. Cause I had the measurements that I have to meet and reach. And now it’s more collaborative. I think it’s, you know, threefold people who I work with.

They want to sit in my seat at some point in time to. I have to do some mentoring as an organic part of my job. And three, what we’re doing has to make sense that we shouldn’t be doing it. And that’s, that’s really, you know, kind of how I look at it holistically breath. Does that make sense?

[00:04:58] Brad Seaman: Tell me a little bit about the business.

Now, just walk us through kind of how you got there and then talk about the business today.

[00:00:00] Amahl Williams: Yep. So here’s the thing for me, right? So just as by way of pedigree and background, I was a three sport captain in college very active throughout the entire school year. And I had to have different levels of conditioning for each one of the sports. And so part of being soccer dad that I like is one sports.

I didn’t play with soccer. Right. But I know there are some principles that are foundational to all sports, right. So it’s going to be conditioning, right? It’s going to be coachability, right. It’s going to be available. And then it’s going to be teamwork and sportsmanship to me, all sports, have those elements.

I think those are things that regardless of your skill set, you can strive towards achieving or attaining. Right? Additionally, my aunt gave me this additional charter and kind of intimidated me. So as he interviewed at Facebook and got the gig there, she talked about, she wanted her work to be beautiful.

Right. She never wanted somebody to question the caliber. Or the quality of her work. She always wanted to create an output that said, this person is invested. This person is informed. This person cares about the outcome. And I think some of the lessons when we talk about sports, it’s I don’t want a lot from the teams that are undefeated.

I really don’t. Right. Because being undefeated is only hard. If you lose to somebody who isn’t as good as you, the teams that I liked are the one and two loss teams, because it’s like, how did you bounce back from utopia? So what I, what I typically see is. In healthy sports cultures, right? The folks that are in the lead or the start.

They have earned that. Right. And the backups don’t question, it’s like, Jeff is better than me, right? Todd is exceptional or whatever it may be as, as, as my qualifier. So what my son, he’s very good at sports to the extent to which a seven year old can be good. Right? So path of least resistance, you know, high velocity scoring and all these other things like that.

Right. But now, as the kids are catching up and it’s becoming more competitive, this is where that discipline comes in. Am I on time and my early am I ready mentally? Am I helping my teammates and all of those things? And so for me, I honestly don’t care about the outcome of the game because of they’re so young that we don’t even measure it.

And during the pandemic we gave up, also the measurement, what I am going to be concerned about is the efforts while he’s on the pitch, because he’s a bigger kid, right? The kids look up to him, they respond, may interact with him differently based upon the success of the game. And so to me, When I played college sports, I never wanted my backup to be like a mall’s just there.

Cause he’s bigger than me and genetics. And what have you. I want it to be somebody where I gave an effort and I had a pedigree around my work ethic where they said, you know what? Not only should I aspire to do the things that he’s doing, but I think he’s doing the things that put him in a position to be successful.

And, you know, I love that part of the game because there’s plenty of guys on, on every team, Akron, you know I own it wherever you look. There’s second and third string guys who were never going to touch the field other than blowouts and may be special. Right. That’s not their story. That’s not their legacy.

Their legacy is all the practices, all the bus rides, managing the workload. So you’re grinding it out on in the classroom during the day. You’re prioritizing your physical fitness during the rest of the time. And then there’s your conduct as a part of the team off the field. So there’s just so many more life lessons about sports than the outcome of the game that I thought that that would be a nice carry over into business.

Right? It’s not about the work that gets published. It’s what you’ve learned about the work. That didn’t get published and how you can repurpose it and leverage it kind of going forward. It’s not about the first customer it’s I got this from my last interview. I think Kelsey saw this it’s about how your company has to change to make sure it stays above $10 million for the rest of his existence.

And some of those behaviors and patterns are like, Are we documenting process, is the process repeatable and scalable? Have we gotten the folks who were part of the team to buy into the vision? Have we taken their feedback? So now they own some of the process. And so when I look at those things, there are a lot of corollaries and overlaps, but I just don’t want my son to look at them as buying them.

Right. So when he’s doing his class where he does really well at stem stuff, cause he has half of my brain and the other half is my wife’s brain. I want him to raise towards the things that he’s weak. Right. And I don’t want him to slack at the things that he’s strong at. And so that’s where I coach him.

I don’t want to say I coach my, my colleagues because that’s not what I do with my colleagues. I share my vision. I tell them why I think they’re special and what I think that they do well. And then I had to have them pitch back to me their vision. So it’s like based upon your understanding of what we need to do to be successful and how I kind of talked about you, what I like about you and how I think.

All of us be successful, you know, which parts of this do you want to own? And that’s new for me. Before I was a partner, I didn’t have to do that. It was more like, do what I say. Cause I had the measurements that I have to meet and reach. And now it’s more collaborative. I think it’s, you know, threefold people who I work with.

They want to sit in my seat at some point in time to. I have to do some mentoring as an organic part of my job. And three, what we’re doing has to make sense that we shouldn’t be doing it. And that’s, that’s really, you know, kind of how I look at it holistically breath. Does that make sense?

[00:04:58] Brad Seaman: Tell me a little bit about the business.

Now, just walk us through kind of how you got there and then talk about the business today.

[00:05:04] Amahl Williams: Yeah. Sure. So, you know when you look at RPA plus IPA, plus a robotic process, automation, intelligent process automation at its core, it’s just data processing, right? So if you have a lot of people, 70 analysts doing a lot of the similar work, a hundred accountants doing a lot of the similar work.

What we’re trying to do is take away some of the mundane tasks from your back and middle office employees to improve their quality of life, to improve the quality of the inputs and to allow businesses to scale costs. RPA is a part of that story. IPA is including the humans as a part of that story.